1334 North Benson Avenue; Unit D
Upland, CA 91786
 

   
   
 
 
   

   

3rd Saturday of the month from 6-8 PM

   

Art Talks is an extension of the education and exhibition
programming of the Inland Empire Museum of Art
to inform, educate and engage.

   
   
   

Jun15th | Art Theater for the Mind

   

Panel discussion with artists: Dani Dodge, Jim Morphesis, & Susan Ossman| Moderator: William Catling

   
   
    Dani Dodge
   

Dani Dodge uses unexpected sculptural materials to alter spaces.

Her experience as an embedded journalist during the 2003 invasion of Iraq changed her forever. Since then, she has created art and installations that change and challenge expectations.

The installations merge the rational and the dream state. They often require interaction with the viewers.

 
Dani Dodge
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
    Jim Morphesis
   

Jim Morphesis is an American painter born to Greek American, parents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He won the Young Talent Award from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in Los Angeles, California, in 1983.

Since the 1980s, Jim Morphesis has been one of the most influential members of the expressionist art movement in Los Angeles. Morphesis most often works serially, on imagery and themes as varied as the Passion of the Christ (influenced by his Greek Orthodox upbringing), nude torsos (inspired by Rembrandt and Soutine) and universal symbols of mortality, including skulls and roses.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Jim Morphesis
  Susan Ossman
 
Susan Ossman
 

I am an artist, a scholar and a writer. On a perfect day I write in the morning, paint in the afternoon and do research all of the time. I think of works of art as embodying particular moments in the ongoing processes of  reflection. For me painting is particularly sensual and contemplative. Drawing feels more disengaged and intellectual.  

Words can flow or have  sharp edges. I like to explore a question across diverse media and in changing locations. I often conceive unlikely mixtures of materials to provoke emotion, thought and consciousness. I make  installations, often with silk. I design collaborative and participatory projects and performances.  I devise situations and protocols to generate objects or performances that ask viewers and audiences to question their assumptions

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
    William Catling
 
Susan Ossman
  William Catling, MFA, was born in San Francisco and grew up in the Bay Area. He decided at an early age that art was what he wanted to do for life. Catling taught high school for 10 years, then moved to Southern California to begin teaching at APU in 1991. As an artist, he attempts to address the loss of our natural sense of being human—that is, our deeply intuitive sense of ourselves. He believes we have become disconnected from the natural rhythms of life. 

The figures Catling makes are rough, cracked, aged, reflecting suffering and the internal capacity to connect to others outside oneself. Such suffering can evoke the viewer’s empathy and self-transcendence. Viewers can embrace the condition of the figures, thus engaging themselves in the process of reconnecting by joining in the transcendent element of the work. The work does not eliminate the body’s suffering but presents it as a condition for spiritual uplift.
 
William Catling
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
       
       
     
 
William Catling