online exhibits & catalogs

   
     
       
 
 

Faces: Portraits from the Collection

We see so many people in a day.  Faces in public, at home, at work, in our social life.  Why would a person attend an exhibit entitled Faces: Portraits from the Collection? More importantly, why would a person even create portraits? The big answer to both questions is that we are human. As humans, we are compelled to create, explore, and interpret. 

Our expression is only limited by our imagination, materials, and technology.  And people are the likely subjects of our creative attention. The portraits in Faces: Portraits from the  Collection are wonderful examples of the many ways humans have interpreted humans.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
 

A Visit With 50 Artists: In Their Studios

I can’t imagine a world with only one type of art. With the unique vision and style each artist creates a string of stories by which we all as share metaphors of life. No two people see the same thing in the same way. Each of us witnesses the world from a different perspective, we each have unique thoughts and emotions, and we each build on a different set of experiences. A photograph can expand our vision by making us think, making us wonder and by summoning our emotions.

With photography I compose stories, thoughts and ideas into a unique visual metaphor to show the wonder that surrounds us.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
 

 

Fragments: an archeology of memory

A unique artistic perspective from a Vietnam veteran. This artwork has facilitated the uncovering of bits of blocked memories, pieces of the reality that was too harsh to hold onto, to in the 70’s, too difficult to relive fully today With a paintbrush as his tool, Johnson allows his subconscious access to his studio and we benefit by these dozens of abstract paintings and assemblage. The images are fragments that interplay with poems, short stories and plays written after 911. The written words, rather than explaining the images, point beyond or behind the artwork.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
     

 

 

Distinct Perspective: from Eastern Europe

This exhibit features three artists from Eastern Europe: Armenia, Yugoslavia and Russia. While currently living in Southern California, their emigration to the US radically impacted their art work. Frescos, paintings, metal sculptures…Three artists, with disparate work, have the common threads of foreign homelands and the passionate pursuit of their own unique kind of art.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
 
 

Presidental Images: America's Leaders

With our last election we thought  it would be nice show the chronological List of Presidents, First Ladies, and Vice Presidents of the United States and other interesting tidbits.

 

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
   
 

Epitaphs: what dreams are made of...

Think back to several years ago, whether it feels like a long time, or just a few moments, your mind will mark the unexpected twists and turns of your life’s journey. Now, consider tomorrow. What if you knew when you were going to die?  What would be the one thing you would want to leave with the world?

 

These artists give us an insider’s view into what holds value for them. While most are still living, their journeys speak of faith, trust, grief, hope, despair, healing, redemption, lessons, losses, warnings and of vindication. They address questions we can’t help asking, even though we know the answers cannot fully be realized while living in this world. How would you want to be remembered? What would your “epitaph” look like?

“...For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause.” "Hamle
t" Act III Scene 1

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
     
      A Look Back at: Millford Zornes
      A look back at Berlin and the Eastern Sector
      The Real Grapes of Wrath:
Photographs from the Farm Security Administration
     
      Stories from the Art
       
       
       
       
       
       
 
© 2017 Inland Empire Museum of Art
All Art © by The Artist